Sunday, 12 October 2008

1707 Again

With the imminent nationalisation of both the Bank of Scotland and the Royal Bank of Scotland at the cost to the Exchequer of £50billion or many £Mandelsons, would it not be reasonable to expect economies to be made in North Britain such as the abolition of its devolved parliament and executive? For isn't the payment from mainly English taxpayers to bail out the Scottish-based banks a twenty-first century version of The Equivalent? Ironically the Royal Bank of Scotland was established as the Equivalent Society to administer the £398,085 10s bail out to settle the debts of the Company of Scotland. By the way, that is now worth either this or £59.7million so have English taxpayers paid too much for Scottish debts at the insistence of our Scottish Prime Minister and Scottish Chancellor?

4 comments:

William Gruff said...

An interesting post, would you care to expand upon it? Modern history was not 'my period', as historians are fond of saying, (I had ambitions in the mediaeval sphere - even then northern 'Br*tain' was a pain in the English arse), so I know little of the accommodations made for the act of 'union' and I would be grateful for more information and some links.

Gallimaufry said...

Hi, may I recommend the wikipedia articles on the Act of Union (although rather scotocentric imo) the Equivalent and the Darien adventure. Much Scotch rage is directed at the "bribes" paid by the perfidious English to Scotch parliamentarians to agree to the Union. When I read the text of the Act of Union I was amazed by the relatively easy terms the Scotch were given - not like the unconditional surrender of Heath's Common Market entry treaty.

James Higham said...

The old, old story.

TBRRob said...

Could we fire them back over the border using a catapult... Please...